I recently ran into a java.lang.OutOfMemoryError exception after moving a Tomcat Web Application from a 32-bit system to a 64-bit system. Not being able to give the JVM more memory, I decided to install a 32-bit JDK on the machine. Getting a 32-bit Tomcat install working on a 64-bit system gave me a bit of trouble, so I decided to write this article.

Installing a 32-bit JDK is very easy. First, download the right package from the sun download site: http://java.sun.com/javase/downloads/index.jsp and extract it. To extract the .bin file, you need to make sure to make the .bin file executable. After that, you can run the file and it should extract itself to the current directory. You can now use the JDK by referencing it directly or by setting it as an alternative using the appropriate instructions. For the purpose of this article however, we don’t need to get into that. Next, you will need to update your start/stop scripts to take advantage of the new JDK.
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As a weekend project I decided to set up a LAML, (Linux, Apache, MySQL, Lua) stack on my computer. I never worked with Lua before, but I figured it wouldn’t be too hard to get it working with my MAMP setup. Getting started, I spent some time reading any articles I could find on the web that talked about setting up or using using Lua for web development. I quickly ran into the Kepler Project which as their website points out:

is an open source platform that brings the power of Lua to web development

While this was my goal, I wanted to start from scratch since I haven’t had any experience with the language and didn’t want to learn it on a specific platform just yet. So, I went on to figure out how to install and configure Lua with MAMP. To accomplish this yourself, you will need: Xcode, MAMP, Lua, LuaRocks, MAMP source, and mod_fcgid.
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Ext3 Data Recovery

in Linux

I recently found myself in a tough situation when I accidentally typed rm * <dir_name>/ as opposed to rm <dir_name>/* , deleting the current project I was working on. Having instantly realized my mistake, I quickly unmounted my drive and powered down the machine I was working on. As I frantically searched the net for some way to undo what I had just done, it seemed as though my month’s hard work was slipping further and further down the drain. Almost every post and response I found seemed to point towards the horrible truth that I might have to rebuild my entire project from scratch. This, of course, was not a suitable solution.
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Author's picture

Andrew Vayanis

I am a Software Engineer, Technologist, Gamer, but most importantly, I am a student of life.


Engineering Lead


California, USA